Contact Your Representative Regarding NIH Funding


Background: U.S. Congress recently approved a Continuing Resolution to keep the government operating through mid-December. In the coming months, the White House and Congressional leaders will be negotiating terms for a final FY 2016 budget. With regard to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), there is a significant gap between what the Senate and House Appropriations Committees have proposed. NIH would receive a $32 billion budget (a $2 billion increase) under the Senate bill and a $1.1 billion increase in the House bill.

Recommended Action: Now would be the time to contact your Representative in the House to ask him or her to support the maximum level of funding for NIH in FY 2016. The AAAAI's Advocacy Committee suggests that you:

• express support for the $32 billion NIH budget provided by the Senate
• ask your Representative to encourage House budget negotiators to agree to this level of funding
• briefly describe the importance of NIH funding to your institution and/or state
• briefly describe the focus of your own research (if you are currently involved in any)

To reach your Representative's office, call the Capitol Hill Switchboard at (202) 224-3121 and ask to be connected to his or her office. Once connected, ask to speak to the staff person who handles appropriations for the Department of Health and Human Services.

If you do not know your Representative's name, you can find it by clicking here.

Electronic communication is less effective, but if you prefer, the website above has links to each Representative's website where you can find email contact information. Please encourage others to contact their Representative in support of an NIH budget increase.

For additional information, contact Lynn Morrison, the AAAAI's Washington representative working on this issue, at Lynn.Morrison@whaonline.org.

The AAAAI will keep you informed as the NIH appropriations process moves forward. Thank you for participating in this effort.

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